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amina khatun
Jan 20, 2022
In General Discussions
The past few years were dominated by special database all major database vendors introducing and improving their database cluster products. There is the bread of shared nothing clusters like Microsoft SQL Server 2008 and there are the share everything clusters like Oracle and Sybase. It is special database amazing how far these technologies have come and how much we got used to "always available" databases. You know what's coming next. Now, that we have uninterrupted access to data, it would be great if we get the data faster. Well, the database vendors have an special database answer for that as well. It was about 7 years ago when I first was introduced special database into the concept of in-memory databases. At the time it was less known database vendor called Times-Ten that offered an in-memory database with blazing performance metrics, hence times ten. It was the perfect answer to solid state disk drives that special database could drain an IT budget in a hurry. Apparently this technology was so intriguing that Oracle special database decided to buy Times Ten and make it Oracle's in-memory database. The only downside to this is, it is not an Oracle database in memory, it is Times Ten's engine running in memory. This creates admin nightmares to have special skills to special database manage the Times Ten engine in addition to the Oracle server, as well as different software development techniques for both systems. Performance gains out weight manageability concerns, I guess? Just recently Sybase announced its Sybase ASE special database server, in version 15.5, will have an in-memory engine equivalent that will provide the same functionality and manageability as the standard Sybase ASE server. This is a remarkable step, because it provides performance gains transparent to client special database applications and the database engine will not challenge DBAs to learn new skills. To me this is a win-win situation.
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